Pre-Listing Home Inspection/Seller Inspection

realtor
Advantages to the Real Estate Agent:
  • Agents can recommend certified InterNACHI inspectors, as opposed to being at the mercy of buyer’s choices in inspectors.
  • Sellers can schedule the inspections at seller’s convenience, with little effort on the part of agents.
  • Sellers can assist inspectors during the inspections, something normally not done during buyers’ inspections.
  • Sellers can have inspectors correct any misstatements in the reports before they are generated.
  • The reports help sellers see their homes through the eyes of a critical third-party, thus making sellers more realistic about asking price.
  • Agents are alerted to any immediate safety issues found, before other agents and potential buyers tour the home.
  • Repairs made ahead of time might make homes show better.
  • Reports hosted online entice potential buyers to tour the homes.
  • The reports provide third-party, unbiased opinions to offer to potential buyers.
  • Clean reports can be used as marketing tools to help sell the homes.
  • The reports might relieve prospective buyers’ unfounded suspicions, before they walk away.
  • Seller inspections eliminate “buyer’s remorse” that sometimes occurs just after an inspection.
  • Seller inspections reduce the need for negotiations and 11th-hour re-negotiations.
  • Seller inspections relieve the agent of having to hurriedly procure repair estimates or schedule repairs.
  • The reports might encourage buyers to waive their inspection contingencies.
  • Deals are less likely to fall apart, the way they often do, when buyer’s inspections unexpectedly reveal last-minute problems.
  • Reports provide full-disclosure protection from future legal claims.
Advantages to the Home Buyer:
  • The inspection is done already.
  • The inspection is paid for by the seller.
  • The report provides a more accurate third-party view of the condition of the home prior to making an offer.
  • A seller inspection eliminates surprise defects.
  • Problems are corrected, or at least acknowledged, prior to making an offer on the home.
  • A seller inspection reduces the need for negotiations and 11th-hour re-negotiations.
  • The report might assist in acquiring financing.
  • A seller inspection allows the buyer to sweeten the offer without increasing the offering price by waiving inspections.

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

Pre-Listing Home Inspection/Seller Inspection

inspectingelectrical
Advantages to the Seller:
  • The seller can choose a certified InterNACHI inspector rather than be at the mercy of the buyer’s choice of inspector.
  • The seller can schedule the inspections at the seller’s convenience.
  • It might alert the seller to any items of immediate concern, such as radon gas or active termite infestation.
  • The seller can assist the inspector during the inspection, something normally not done during a buyer’s inspection.
  • The seller can have the inspector correct any misstatements in the inspection report before it is generated.
  • The report can help the seller realistically price the home if problems exist.
  • The report can help the seller substantiate a higher asking price if problems don’t exist or have been corrected.
  • A seller inspection reveals problems ahead of time, which:
    • might make the home show better.
    • gives the seller time to make repairs and shop for competitive contractors.
    • permits the seller to attach repair estimates or paid invoices to the inspection report.
    • removes over-inflated buyer-procured estimates from the negotiation table.
  • The report might alert the seller to any immediate safety issues found, before agents and visitors tour the home.
  • The report provides a third-party, unbiased opinion to offer to potential buyers.
  • A seller inspection permits a clean home inspection report to be used as a marketing tool.
  • A seller inspection is the ultimate gesture in forthrightness on the part of the seller.
  • The report might relieve a prospective buyer’s unfounded suspicions, before they walk away.
  • A seller inspection lightens negotiations and 11th-hour re-negotiations.
  • The report might encourage the buyer to waive the inspection contingency.
  • The deal is less likely to fall apart, the way they often do, when a buyer’s inspection unexpectedly reveals a last-minute problem.
  • The report provides full-disclosure protection from future legal claims.

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

Seasonal Maintenance Checklist: In the Spring

springhome

Spring has sprung!  March 20th was the first day of spring, so as you are spending more time outdoors, take a few minutes to address some Spring home maintenance items that will help to maintain the value of your investment:

  • Roof:  Check for damage to your roof.  Especially here in Oklahoma you should do this after each big spring storm.
  • Exterior Siding & Trim:  Check all the fascia and trim for deterioration and caulk as needed.
  • Masonry:  Check for masonry cracks or voids and tuck-point as needed.
  • HVAC:  Have an HVAC professional inspect and maintain your system as recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Water Heater:  Check your water heater for leaks or rust.  Drain water heater tank to reduce sediment (consult a licensed plumber first if you have not been doing this annually for your water heater).
  • Fire Extinguishers:  Check you fire extinguishers.  I recommend you have one for your kitchen and garage.
  • Kitchen Exhaust:  Clean the kitchen exhaust hood and air filter.
  • Concrete:  Repair all cracked, broken and uneven driveways and walks to help provide a level walking surface.
  • Plumbing:  Check the shutoff valves at the plumbing fixtures to make sure they function.
  • Dryer Exhaust:  Clean the clothes dryer exhaust duct and damper and the space under the dryer.  Ensure that your dryer is venting to the exterior and not to the attic or garage.
  • Gutters:  Clean gutters and downspouts.  Repair as necessary.  Make sure water is diverted from the home.
  • Filters:  Replace HVAC filters, water treatment system filters, water filter in the refrigerator, and any other filters as needed.
  • Concrete:  Pressure wash deck, drive, and walkways.
  • Exterior:  Walk exterior perimeter of house and check for potential entry points for critters.
  • Detectors:  Replace batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

 

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175

homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

#springhomemaintenance  #timeoutdoors #greatoutdoors

 

Weep Holes

weepholes

Did you ever wonder why your home has those little holes at the bottom of your brick walls?  Have you tried to plug them due to concerns about spider and rodent entry?  Well, if you have, you are not alone.  As home inspectors we see this problem all the time.  So here is a little information about these holes known as Weep Holes.

Modern masonry veneer walls should have drainage provisions installed.  Weep holes allow water that has reached the space behind the veneer to drain out of the wall system.  Weep holes can be created by simply leaving out the mortar from every fourth or fifth vertical joint in the bottom course of the wall.  Flashing installed at the bottom of the wall will direct the water out of the weep holes.

Weep holes can be an integral part of a vented rain screen.  This screen reduces the amount of water that can be forced through a masonry veneer wall during wind-driven rains.  During a wind-driven rainstorm, there is a positive, high pressure on the outside of the masonry wall, and a low or atmospheric pressure at the interior.  This pressure difference can drive moisture into the masonry material and through the wall.

Modern masonry veneer walls have a cavity or air space behind them.  This air space is typically 1 inch wide and located between the masonry and the interior wall.  This space is vented to the outside with the use of weep holes located at the bottom of the wall.  During heavy windstorms, air enters the weep holes and pressurizes the space behind the masonry veneer.  As a result of this pressurized air space, there is a smaller pressure difference across the masonry units.  Less water will move into and through the masonry.

If water goes through the masonry, it will drain down the air space or rain screen.  The water will reach the weep holes at the bottom of the wall and will be directed outside by the flashing.  Weep holes let air and water pass through them.

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

#homesweethome  #homemaintenance

Roof-Drainage Maintenance: Part 3 of 3

gutterextension

Downspouts
Downspouts are designed to drain water from the gutters and discharge it a safe distance away from the foundation. They often discharge directly onto the ground, but through the use of extensions and other devices, they should be configured in such a way that roof runoff does not saturate the soil at or beneath the foundation.

Water from a downspout that discharges next to the home’s foundation can wash away soil from beneath the wall, leaving the foundation unsupported in large areas. If too much of the wall loses support, it may settle unevenly or even crack. This can lead to moisture intrusion or even flooding in the basement or crawlspace, not to mention costly repairs.

Downspouts should connect to the gutters securely and be free of debris. They should have some device (such as an extension or splashblock) that will carry runoff away from the foundation before discharging it to the soil. Clogged downspouts will cause runoff to overflow the gutter, which can create hazardous and unsightly puddles.

downspoutdrain

Some downspouts may be tied into perimeter drains, and this can be a problem when the ground is frozen. Ice may prevent the system from working. When this happens, some homeowners may disconnect the downspout, but they may never re-connect them, which can create new problems.

Interior Downspouts
In-roof gutters sometimes connect to downspouts installed inside the exterior walls. In older homes, these downspouts are made of metal and eventually corrode and leak. Internal downspout leakage can sometimes go unnoticed for long enough to do considerable structural damage, such as decay of home’s the wooden framing.

Now that you know more about what can go wrong when you neglect regular roof-drainage maintenance, you’ll hopefully be less likely to put off cleaning out those gutters. Your home will thank you!

 

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

Roof-Drainage Maintenance: Part 2 of 3

gutteringaluminum

Gutter Materials

Galvanized steel gutters are the most common type of gutters. If they’re painted, it may be difficult to tell steel gutters from aluminum just by looking, but you should be able to tell the difference by tapping on them with your finger or by using a magnet (aluminum will not react). They’re durable but not invulnerable to damage, which can include dents from hail or windblown debris and separation due to age or improper installation. Metal gutters are subject to corrosion, especially if debris has been allowed to accumulate. Debris holds moisture next to the metal, so watch for corrosion in gutters that have tree branches hanging over them. Corrosion often starts at the seams.

gutteringcopper

Copper gutters generally last a long time compared to steel and vinyl, but they’re the most expensive type and, therefore, less common. Vinyl gutters are comparatively inexpensive and can be made to match different colors and styles. However, depending on their quality, they can be fragile, and you may find them broken or disconnected at vulnerable points in the system. They can be repaired using special adhesives, but replacement may be necessary if damage is severe or extensive.

Gutter Installation
Problems with installation range from improperly sloped gutters to gutters that are loose or poorly attached. You may be able to identify improper slope by observing standing water in the gutter, or the accumulation of sediment in portions of the gutter away from the downspouts. You can check the slope from the ground by looking at the margins between the gutter and roof or the gutter and fascia. On homes with steeper roofs, the gutters may need to be installed using standoffs to help ensure that runoff doesn’t overshoot them. In areas that experience snowfall, it’s not unusual to find gutters bent from sliding snow, especially on homes with metal roofs.

 

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

Roof-Drainage Maintenance: Part 1 of 3

downspout1

Spring rains are just around the corner here in the south of the US.  It’s time to give a little extra attention to your roofs drainage system to ensure it is doing it’s job-taking water away from your home and foundation.

Next time you are outside your home with some good daylight, take a look at the surfaces you can see from the ground.  Make sure there are no trees or branches withing 5 feet of your roofs surface.  Also look for any debris that may have accumulated over the winter.  If you see either, make a plan to remove both safely as soon as possible.  A little money spent now on a handyman could save you big bucks down the road.

roofdebris

Guttering is one of the best ways to channel water where you want it to go.  While cleaning out the gutters may not be everyone’s favorite home-maintenance task, gutters filled with debris will not drain properly. Ice dams can form in freezing weather, which can essentially shut down your roof’s entire drainage system, possibly forcing unwanted moisture in through your roof and attic. Also, if runoff from the roof is allowed to discharge too close to the home’s foundation, either because of neglected gutter maintenance or even improper system installation, serious structural problems can develop that can compromise the stability of the entire home. That’s why it’s essential that you monitor and maintain your roof-drainage system.

The most common roof-drainage system in residential construction is gutters hung from the roof edge attached to downspouts. The gutters may be open or covered on top, with seams, or seamless. The gutters should be connected to downspouts that direct water away from the home’s foundation. The downspout may lead down to a concrete splash block that prevents water from draining directly into the soil next to the foundation.

The gutter problems you discover may be related to the materials from which the gutters are made, the quality of the installation, environmental conditions, or a combination of all three.

Check back for more information on keeping the water away from your home!

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

#springcleaning #homemaintenance #guttercleaning

Oklahoma Earthquakes: Part 3

wallcrack

If you have lived in Oklahoma for at least a decade, you probably consider yourself somewhat of an expert on severe weather and tornadoes.

Now that we are arguably the earthquake capitol of the planet, we need to become experts on another way mother earth lets us know who’s boss.

As spring approaches and we spend more time outside (hopefully!), we need to be on the lookout for changes in our homes that may need to be addressed before they become bigger, more expensive problems.

Here is a list that FEMA has put out of things to check as you move in and around your home.

1. Check The External House Structure:

• Survey all portions of your house to see if any part collapsed or sustained damage.

• Check to see if the house shifted on its foundation, or fell away from the foundation in any place.

• Check to see if the house is noticeably leaning, or looks tilted from a distance.

• Look for severe cracks or openings, especially around outdoor steps or porches.

• If inside the house, check to see if you are experiencing seriously increased vibrations from passing trucks and buses.

• Look for cracks in external walls. Check to see if existing cracks in the walls are getting bigger.

• Check to see if mortars are separating from the blocks.

• Look for sink holes or large divots in the ground next to the foundation.

2. Check The Chimneys:

• Look for cracks between the chimney and the exterior wall or the roof.

• Look for cracks in the liner.

• Check to see if there is unexplained debris in the fireplace.

3. Check Utilities:

• Check to see if power lines to your house are noticeably sagging.

• Check to see if hot water heater is leaning or tilted.

• Check to see if all the water connections, dry-pipes, toilets, faucets are secure.

4. Check the Inside Of the House:

• Check to see if doors and windows are harder to open, and if doors do not shut properly.

• Check to see if the roof is leaking. Look for water damage to the ceiling.

• Check to see if the furnace has shifted in any way, and if ducts and exhaust pipes are connected and undamaged.

• If inside the house, check to see if you are experiencing unexplained draftiness. Look for cracks in the walls, poorly aligned window frames, and loosened exterior siding. They can all let in breezes.

• Check to see if the floor is separated from walls or stairwells inside the house.

• Look for cracks between walls and built-in fixtures such as lights, cupboards or bookcases.

• Look for gaps around plumbing pipes that exit the foundation wall.

Aron Ralston pointed this fact out in his book Between a Rock and a Hard Place years ago.  Everything in our environment is moving.  Some things move quickly, and some move very slowly, but everything is moving.

The ground beneath us is moving much more quickly these days, so be on the lookout for problems that may compromise your homes well being.

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

Getting Your House Inspected

Getting a house inspected doesn’t guarantee smooth sailing. You need to play an active role in the process.

You can be confident that you’re buying a good, solid house … even if you’re not a structural engineer, plumber, roofer, or professional air quality evaluator.

How? You hire a home inspector, of course.

This is true for new-construction homes, historic treasures, or your standard 30-year-old find.

But wait — first learn about home inspection tips that could save you money and keep you from making missteps along the way.

1. Not getting multiple recommendations

Your real estate agent might suggest a home inspector, and that inspector could turn out to be wonderful. But you’re the one buying the house, so make sure you choose well. Besides asking your friends and neighbors, use the American Society of Home Inspectors to vet their recommendations and make sure you hire someone who’s qualified.

“Interview the inspector and find out about how they work, what their background and training are, whether they are licensed and insured, attend continuing education classes, and have a communication style that you are comfortable with,” says Welmoed Sisson, a Maryland home inspector.

2. Not attending the inspection

Because buyers get a report from the inspector after the job’s done, many people don’t realize they can be at the inspection. In fact, good inspectors expect you to be there. That way, they can show you what they find and let you know whether it’s a big deal or not.

Unfortunately, some inspectors might cut corners, which is another reason to be there. Don’t let some snow or construction debris prevent your inspector from checking a hard-to-get-to area.

“If it’s raining, the home inspector may avoid inspecting some exterior areas, such as the deck or crawl spaces,” says Massachusetts real estate attorney Rob Pellegrini.

If that happens, there’s a possibility a potential problem could be missed.

3. Being too intimidated to ask questions

Unless you’re a contractor, you probably don’t know much about the “guts” of the house: the electrical, plumbing, and HVAC systems.

So attend the inspection — and ask plenty of questions. “A good inspector will answer all of your questions thoroughly and will explain what he’s doing and looking at all along the way,” says Rob Williams, a Washington, DC, real estate agent.

If you don’t understand what the inspector just told you, ask for clarification. “Don’t let it slide because you’re too scared to ask,” says Williams.

4. Not turning on utilities

For a normal home inspection, the utilities will still be connected by the sellers — but that isn’t always the case. “With certain foreclosure properties, it’s the buyer’s responsibility to get utilities turned on for an inspection,” says Williams.

If utilities are turned off, you’ll miss seeing important stuff, such as whether the dishwasher drains properly, the pipes leak, or the water flow is sufficient. (When you have a head full of shampoo isn’t when you want to find that out.)

5. Not testing for water and mold problems

If the home you’re buying gets its water from a drinking well (about 15% of U.S. homes do), you need to have the water tested for contaminants.

Caroline Blazovsky, a healthy-home expert in New Jersey, says everyone should get water tested — whether the water comes from a well or from a public source. “Water testing can tell you about the integrity of your plumbing, if you have copper or PVC, or if you have arsenic, lead, or radon exposure in the home.”

It’s also important to test for mold. “Mold remediation can be expensive, and if you have toxic molds, you may end up with health complaints,” says Blazovsky.

6. Assuming a new-construction home is fine

You probably wouldn’t have a new car inspected by a mechanic before buying it, so the same goes when buying a new house, right?

Surprisingly, new homes still need to be inspected. Some have been known to topple faster than a five-tier wedding cake without dowel support. Many have defects, even if they did meet county codes.

If the builder reassures you that the house is perfect, get it inspected anyway. Save your urge to gamble for the casinos.

7. Not hiring a specialist if you need to

A home inspector is like a doctor who’s a general practitioner. They both can diagnose problems, and they both know when to refer you to a specialist. If your housing inspector recommends a specialist, you should get one.

“Buyers shouldn’t be discouraged or afraid of paying a little more money to have secondary specialized inspections done,” says Bill Leys of DeckExpert.com. “It may save them a ton of money later on.”

8. Not taking the report seriously

It’s understandable to want to buy a house after you’ve gone to all the trouble of finding it, putting in an offer, and then paying for an inspection. But don’t forget that the inspection is not a mere formality — you actually need to consider the results.

If the inspector finds problems that the seller won’t address, depending on the severity of the problems, you might need to pass on the deal.

Take this advice from David Feldberg, a California real estate broker: “Being out the cost of a home inspection is a lot less than some big problems down the road.”

– See more at: http://www.trulia.com/blog/8-home-inspection-missteps-that-cost-buyers-money/#sthash.z3aVA10j.J4snn9SM.dpuf

Source:
Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.comWe cover all of the bases!Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

Overhead Garage Door Maintenance: Part 3

Garage-Door-Parts-Diagram

Now that we have the main spring taken care of, lets address the other moving parts.

Stand inside the garage and close the garage door, paying attention to all the various moving parts — springs, rollers and hinges. Note the movement of the door parts and those on the overhead track system, as well as the garage door opening system, if there is one.

Wipe away cobwebs, dust, grime and buildup on the door hinges, springs and other moving hardware. Climb a step stool, if necessary, to wipe away buildup or obstructions on the track system overhead, as well as on the rollers on the garage door track.

Squirt small amounts of silicone spray or a couple of drops of oil into the moving parts on the garage door itself, such as the hinges, roller pin, roller mount brackets, and springs, and cable drums. Open the door halfway and repeat the process. Open and close the door a few times to encourage the oil to lubricate moving areas. Spray additional lubricant if needed. Wipe away lubricant that drips using a clean rag.

Place the step stool under one of the tracks if you cannot comfortably reach or see the inner track area overhead. Open the garage door and spray silicone lubricant into the centers of the rollers that ride on the track on each side. Next apply some silicon lubricant to the center “J” track to keep it moving smoothly.  Close and open the door several times to allow the lubricant to flow. Wipe away any drips to prevent collections of dirt and dust.

Your garage door should now be ready for many more months of smooth operation!

As with any home maintenance, always think safety.  Safety glasses are recommended as well as following safety warnings on step stools and ladders used. Refer to any owners manual you have on your Overhead Garage Door for specific maintenance tips.

Scott Price, CPI, #1532

Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

#home maintenance  #spring home maintenance  #preventive maintenance