Under-Sink Plumbing

Sinks are a category of plumbing fixtures that includes kitchen sinks, service sinks, bar sinks, mop sinks and wash sinks. A sink is considered a different item than a lavatory (or a bathroom sink), although the terms are often used interchangeably. Sinks can be made of enameled cast-iron, vitreous china, stainless steel, porcelain-enameled formed steel, non-vitreous ceramic, and plastic materials.

Sink waste outlets should have a minimum diameter of 1-1/2 inches. Most kitchen sinks have an opening of 3-1/2 inches in diameter. A food-waste grinder has a standard opening of 3-1/2 inches, and so do most kitchen sink basket strainers. A strainer or crossbar should be provided to restrict the clear opening of the waste outlet.

Plumbing Requirements for Garbage Disposals
Food-waste grinders (also known as garbage disposals and disposers) are designed to grind foods, including bones, into small-sized bits that can flow through the drain line. Using them to dispose of fibrous and stringy foods, such as corn husks, celery, banana skins and onions, is not recommended because fibers tend to pass by the grinder teeth, move into the drain pipe, and cause drains to clog.

Water must be supplied to the grinder to assist during its operation in transporting waste. The water flushes the grinder chamber and carries the waste down the drainpipe. Blockage may result if the grinder is used without running the water during operation. Grinders should be connected to a drain of not less than 1-1/2 inches in diameter. Food-waste grinders are supplied with water from the sink faucet. They do not add to the load used to compute drainage pipe sizing. The drain size required for a grinder is consistent with that for a kitchen sink.

Plumbing Requirements for Dishwashers
The water supply to a residential dishwasher should be protected against backflow by an air gap or backflow preventer. The machine must be equipped with an integral backflow mechanism, or the potable water supply must have either a backflow preventer or an air gap. The discharge pipe from the dishwasher should be increased to a minimum of 3/4-inch in diameter. It should be connected with a wye fitting to the sink tailpiece. Before connecting to the sink tailpiece, the dishwasher waste line should rise and be securely fastened to the underside of the counter. The combined discharge from a sink, dishwasher, and waste grinder is allowed to discharge through a single 1-1/2-inch trap.

Maintenance Tips
Homeowners should take care not to overload the garbage disposal or the dishwasher, as this can lead to leaks and backups in the sink and the plumbing system.  A backup at the kitchen sink may mean that the garbage disposal is clogged, or the plumbing line has some obstruction that prevents proper drainage.  It’s important that homeowners understand the cause of the problem, as well as the proper way to repair it, before dismantling pipes under the sink.  The right size of fittings and replacement parts, as well as proper drainage (including slope and traps) will ensure that the sink will work as it should following a repair, which is why most maintenance issues are best left to professionals, unless the homeowner has the proper instruction, parts and tools available.

Removing Hard Water Deposits from your Faucets

hardwater

You know about these deposits.  I’ve lived in pretty much all the quadrants of the OKC metro and have always had to deal with hard water deposits.  Until I learned how to deal with it appropriately it was often an irritant as water flow was slow of erratic.

So if this sounds familiar, it’s time for a good cleaning.

To remove hard water deposits from your faucet, start by unscrewing the end of the faucet aerator.  These should be just hand tight and removable with a towel.  Take extra care if you have to use a tool and leave the towel between the tool and the aerator.

As you can see, there’s a lot of buildup on this one. Remove any rubber gaskets (don’t lose the pieces and pay attention to what order they assemble in the unit-VERY IMPORTANT).  Manually give the filter a good scrub with an old toothbrush under running water.  This will remove loose surface deposits.

Here’s the secret for removing the calcium and rust in a hurry.  Because calcium is an alkaline earth metal (meaning it has two valence electrons in its outer shell), it’s highly reactive with acids, like vinegar.  If we apply a little more kitchen chemistry, you’ll remember that chemical reactions require energy.  So – heat up enough vinegar (I usually use white vinegar for cleaning) to fully submerge the faucet filter.  Get it hot enough so that is uncomfortable to stick your finger it, not boiling.  Place the faucet filter in the hot vinegar, and watch it go to work.  See all those little bubbles?

Let it sit until it stops bubbling (I left mine in for an hour or so while I went and worked on other things).  Give it a good rinse and scrub with the toothbrush, and it looks almost like new.

If all goes well, the water flows the way it’s supposed to again, too.

The shower heads are often in much the same state.

If you have a flexible shower head,  just place the shower head in a basin on the shower floor.

soaking in vinegar

If you don’t have a hand-held shower head, you can use a plastic bag and a rubber band to secure the vinegar around the shower head for soaking.

Scrub and rinse, and Ta – Daa!  Much better!  Now the shower doesn’t spray sideways past the shower curtain any more.

So let’s get this done before you sell.  A good home inspector will put this type of deficiency in his report and you will have to do it anyway, and it may be more costly if it’s put off too long.

If you are cleaning hard water deposits often, consider the very real possibility that all your plumbing is getting corroded.  Installing a water softener may very well be worth the investment in the long run.

Happy Cleaning!

Source: Commonsensehome.com

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175
homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
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Seasonal Maintenance Checklist: In the Spring

springhome

Spring has sprung!  March 20th was the first day of spring, so as you are spending more time outdoors, take a few minutes to address some Spring home maintenance items that will help to maintain the value of your investment:

  • Roof:  Check for damage to your roof.  Especially here in Oklahoma you should do this after each big spring storm.
  • Exterior Siding & Trim:  Check all the fascia and trim for deterioration and caulk as needed.
  • Masonry:  Check for masonry cracks or voids and tuck-point as needed.
  • HVAC:  Have an HVAC professional inspect and maintain your system as recommended by the manufacturer.
  • Water Heater:  Check your water heater for leaks or rust.  Drain water heater tank to reduce sediment (consult a licensed plumber first if you have not been doing this annually for your water heater).
  • Fire Extinguishers:  Check you fire extinguishers.  I recommend you have one for your kitchen and garage.
  • Kitchen Exhaust:  Clean the kitchen exhaust hood and air filter.
  • Concrete:  Repair all cracked, broken and uneven driveways and walks to help provide a level walking surface.
  • Plumbing:  Check the shutoff valves at the plumbing fixtures to make sure they function.
  • Dryer Exhaust:  Clean the clothes dryer exhaust duct and damper and the space under the dryer.  Ensure that your dryer is venting to the exterior and not to the attic or garage.
  • Gutters:  Clean gutters and downspouts.  Repair as necessary.  Make sure water is diverted from the home.
  • Filters:  Replace HVAC filters, water treatment system filters, water filter in the refrigerator, and any other filters as needed.
  • Concrete:  Pressure wash deck, drive, and walkways.
  • Exterior:  Walk exterior perimeter of house and check for potential entry points for critters.
  • Detectors:  Replace batteries in smoke and carbon monoxide detectors.

 

Scott Price, CPI, #1532
Certified Home Inspector
Home Run Inspections
405-905-9175

homeruninspections@icloud.com
We cover all of the bases!

Serving the Oklahoma City metro and surrounding areas including Edmond, Guthrie, Cashion, Yukon, Moore, Norman, Chickasha, Midwest City/Del City, Bethany, El Reno, Shawnee, Harrah, and more.

Schedule Inspections Online at:
www.Home-RunInspections.com
Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/homeruninspections
Follow us on Twitter: www.Twitter.com/HomeRunInspect2

http://www.home-runinspections.com/

#springhomemaintenance  #timeoutdoors #greatoutdoors